Administrators

Looking for an expert on Open Educational Resources (OER) to speak at an event but don’t know who to invite? SPARC is here to help!

This new SPARC primer is designed to give campus leaders and other interested parties an overview of what ALMs are, why they matter, how they complement established utilities and metrics, and how they might be considered for use in the tenure and promotion process.

In 2012, the Committee for Economic Development released the report, "The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?" which concluded that federal Open Access policies will accelerate the research process and return significant economic dividends.

In "Open Access," Peter Suber provides a concise introduction that explains what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold.

A SPARC white paper by Richard Johnson.

This paper examines institutional repositories and describes their potential role and exploring their impact on major stakeholders in the scholarly communication process.

The SPARC Open Access Newsletter (SOAN) is a monthly newsletter authored by Peter Suber and offering news and analysis of the open access movement —the worldwide movement to disseminate scientific and scholarly research literature online, free of charge,

The SPARC Open-Access Funds resource page contains a wealth of background information, practical resources, policy guidelines, and hard data documenting Open-access Fund results to date. It contains information useful to authors, administrators, librarians, and publishers.

This White Paper is written primarily for policymaking staff in universities and other institutional recipients of NIH support responsible for ensuring compliance with the Public Access Policy.

This report presents the finding of a project which investigated the extent to which publishing has now become a core activity of North American academic libraries and suggested ways in which further capacity could be built.

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