Libraries

On our August 6, 2013 webcast our guest speaker, Brian Glanz, showed us that Hackathons are not just for the technologists.

Knowledge Exchange* has released “The Collective Provision of Open Access Resources,” the third report in its multiphase “Sustainability of Open Access Resources” initiative.

This new SPARC primer is designed to give campus leaders and other interested parties an overview of what ALMs are, why they matter, how they complement established utilities and metrics, and how they might be considered for use in the tenure and promotion process.

An open-access fund is a pool of money set aside by an institution to support publication models that enable free, immediate, online distribution of, and access to, scholarly research. 

In 2012, the Committee for Economic Development released the report, "The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?" which concluded that federal Open Access policies will accelerate the research process and return significant economic dividends.

“How do we pay for Open Access?” is a key question faced by publishers, authors, and libraries as awareness and interest in free, immediate, online access to scholarly research increases. SPARC examines the issue of sustainability for current and prospective open-access publishers in a timely new guide, “Income models for Open Access: An overview of current practice,” by Raym Crow.

In "Open Access," Peter Suber provides a concise introduction that explains what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold.

This SPARC discussion paper proposes a federation of discipline-specific publishing cooperatives as an alternative operating model for society publishers.

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