News Archives

August 05, 2013
By:
Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic
"Last week the faculty of the University of California -- some 8,000 professors who work at the highest tier of a massive public education system -- adopted an open-access policy, making their work available to "the people of California and the world" free of charge."
August 02, 2013
Academic Senate of the University of California passed an Open Access Policy on July 24, 2013, ensuring that future research articles authored by faculty at all 10 campuses of UC will be made available to the public at no charge.
August 02, 2013
By:
Jennifer Howard
California State University system adapts open access policy.
July 29, 2013
By:
David Skorton
Discusses White House Open Access Policy.
July 28, 2013
By:
Noam Cohen
Discusses American Historical Association's recent announcement recommending longer embargo periods.
July 26, 2013
By:
Ry Rivard
Recent American Historical Association embargo recommendations for dissertations are hard to quantify any real threat.
July 26, 2013
Our guest speaker, Brian Glanz, is the founder of the Open Science Federation and co-founder of the American chapter of the Open Knowledge Foundation. With both organizations, Brian has lots of experience participating in and deploying Hackathons where Open Access content played a critical part. For two recent examples, he points to the over 100 events associated with http://hackforchange.org in June, and July’s http://hack4ac.com in the scholarly publishing community. Brian will fully explain what Hackathons are, how you deploy them, and why we in the library community should be participating in and utilizing them.
July 25, 2013
By:
Jennifer Howard
Growing interest to open up monographs in the Humanities.
July 22, 2013
In May of this year, 237 individuals and institutions signed the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), which calls for an improvement in the way the output of scientific research is evaluated. The declaration poses a simple but bold proposition: that journal-based metrics should not be used as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist’s contributions, or in making hiring, promotion or funding decisions.

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