News Archives

May 01, 2012
Nick Shockey, the Director of the Right to Research Coalition which EFPSA joined in 2011, hosted a workshop for psychology students attending the annual EFPSA Congress in Denmark last week. The workshop was attended by over 30 congress participants including the newly elected EFPSA President, Dalya Samur. It covered topics ranging from what Open Access is to how students can get involved in advocating Open Access at their universities and national and international organizations.
May 01, 2012
Good news for supporters of open access to the results of taxpayer funded research this week, as Members of Congress continue to express their support for the proposed legislation.
 
May 01, 2012
1. News from SPARC and the Alliance for Taxpayer Access
April 29, 2012
By:
Richard Price, TechCrunch
Editor’s note: This guest post was written by Richard Price, founder and CEO of Academia.edu — a site that serves as a platform for academics to share their research papers and to interact with each other.
April 29, 2012
By:
P. Logan Weygandt, The Baltimore Sun
Free online access to medical journal articles must be the norm.
April 26, 2012
By:
Thomas R. Insel, M.D., National Institute of Mental Health
Meredith, a 15-year-old high school student from San Diego, wrote this year’s breakthrough paper on modeling global epidemics. An 11-year-old boy from upstate New York solved a problem in protein folding using a computer game called Foldit. And an octogenarian working with his retired physician partner created the Cinderella Therapeutics Foundation in Holland to launch rapid trials of drugs rescued from industry.
April 26, 2012
By:
Keith Wagstaff, TIME Magazine
Last week, Harvard’s Faculty Advisory Council revealed that the school now spends $3.75 million annually on academic journal subscriptions. Why so much? According to a memo the council sent out, some journals cost the school up to $40,000 every year, with the two top publishers increasing the price of content 145% over the last six years.
April 26, 2012

Frustrated with business practices that limit their ability to share the results of their scholarship, more than 10,500 academics have now signed the Cost of Knowledge’s online boycott of the journal publisher, Elsevier. Citing disapproval over exorbitant journal prices and profits, restrictive bundling requirements for journal purchasing, and support for legislation to further limit the free exchange of scholarly information, the number of signatories continues to grow steadily.

April 24, 2012
By:
Ian Sample, The Guardian
University wants scientists to make their research open access and resign from publications that keep articles behind paywalls.
April 24, 2012
By:
Tyler Neylon, The Guardian
As more than 10,000 scientists pledge to boycott Elsevier on the Cost of Knowledge website, its creator looks to the future

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