News Archives

February 09, 2012

Today (February 9, 2012), Senators Cornyn (R-TX), Wyden (D-OR), and Hutchison (R-TX) and Representatives Doyle (D-PA), Yoder (R-KS), and Clay (D-MO) introduced the Federal Research Public Access Act, a bill that would ensure free, timely, online access to the published results of research funded by eleven U.S. federal agencies.

February 09, 2012

In a move that signals the growing momentum toward openness, transparency, and accessibility to publicly funded information, the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2012 (FRPAA) has been introduced today in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.

February 09, 2012
By:
University of Pittsburgh
One British professor’s vow to cut ties to journal publishing giant Elsevier has spawned an outpouring of support from like-minded researchers worldwide.
February 08, 2012
By:
KEI Staff
On February 8, 2012, seven public health organisations submitted a letter to Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA), Chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and the other thirty-nine members of this committee opposing H.R. 3699, the "Research Works Act."
February 06, 2012

As the chancellors of Texas’ six public higher education systems, we write in support of the Federal Research Public Access Act

February 04, 2012
By:
The Economist
Academics are starting to boycott a big publisher of journals.
February 03, 2012
By:
David Dobbs, Wired blog
February 02, 2012
By:
Barbara Fister, Library Journal
"The Association of American Publishers (AAP) has done academic librarians a huge favor. When it publicly got behind the Research Works Act, it accomplished something librarians have been trying to do for decades. It turned a lot of scholars into open access activists."
February 02, 2012
By:
The NIH
NIH puts out comprehensive information on Open Access Policies.
February 01, 2012
By:
Jop de Vrieze, ScienceInsider
A movement to boycott scientific publishing giant Elsevier because of the high price of its journals is rapidly gathering steam. Nine days after it started, more than 2600 scientists—including several Fields medalists—have signed a petition at thecostofknowledge.com in which they pledge not to publish papers in Elsevier's journals, nor referee other researchers' studies, or do other types of editorial work for the company.

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