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This paper examines institutional repositories and describes their potential role and exploring their impact on major stakeholders in the scholarly communication process.

This SPARC / Science Commons white paper discusses both the motivation and the process for establishing a binding institutional policy that automatically grants a copyright license from each faculty member to permit deposit of his or her peer-reviewed scholarly articles in institutional repositories, from which the works become available for others to read and cite.

This White Paper is written primarily for policymaking staff in universities and other institutional recipients of NIH support responsible for ensuring compliance with the Public Access Policy.

The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) provided support for a feasibility study, to outline one possible approach to measuring the impacts of the proposed US Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA) on returns to public investment in R&D.

Campus-based publishing partnerships offer the academy greater control over the intellectual products that it helps create. To fully realize this potential, such partnerships will need to evolve from informal working alliances to long-term, programmatic collaborations.

This report presents the finding of a project which investigated the extent to which publishing has now become a core activity of North American academic libraries and suggested ways in which further capacity could be built.

With the emergence of policies calling for rapid, unfettered access to the results of federally funded research, the notion of academic and research libraries providing "public access" to information has taken on an important new meaning.

The following paper was delivered at a program entitled, “Scholarly Journals: Our Futures in the Digital Soup,” presented by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals on December 30, 2004 in conjunction with the Modern Language Association Annual Convention.

As scholarship becomes ever more digitally driven, the communication of peer-reviewed research results has undergone a dramatic transformation. The Internet has created an unprecedented environment where these results can be immediately and broadly shared. As researchers, funding agencies, and policy makers become aware of the opportunities afforded by faster and wider sharing of research results, access policies are evolving accordingly. From policies focusing primarily on protecting this material from unauthorized users, a proliferation of policies designed to leverage the value of funding agencies’ investment in research by sharing the results as widely as possible are now appearing. This paper will examine the rapid evolution of access policies, designed to create a more inclusive scholarly communications playing field, which are now appearing around the world.

To be recognized as an authoritative, high-quality source of information, a journal must be widely available. Indexing and abstracting services facilitate the broadest dissemination of information by pointing researchers to articles that are relevant to the field.

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