Campus Open Access Policies

This is a progress report on the quantitative and anecdotal successes of campus-based OA Funds across North America. The full report can be found here.

SPARC is pleased to join with PLOS and OASPA in releasing an update to the popular HowOpenIsIt? Open Access Spectrum (OAS) guide.

The SPARC Open Access Newsletter (SOAN) is a monthly newsletter authored by Peter Suber and offering news and analysis of the open access movement —the worldwide movement to disseminate scientific and scholarly research literature online, free of charge,

This SPARC / Science Commons white paper discusses both the motivation and the process for establishing a binding institutional policy that automatically grants a copyright license from each faculty member to permit deposit of his or her peer-reviewed scholarly articles in institutional repositories, from which the works become available for others to read and cite.

In a move to encourage researchers to make their work open to the public, the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Calgary established funds that faculty and graduate students could use cover publication charges for open-access journals. Berkeley and Calgary are two of several funds established in recent years, including the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Wisconsin – Madison, the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, the University of Oregon, and other sites in the U.K.

On December 26, 2007, President Bush signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008 into law. The bill contained language requiring all investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to place a copy of manuscripts resulting from NIH-funded research into the National Library of Medicine's online repository, PubMed Central, to be made publicly available within one year of publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The policy will take effect April 7, 2008, and will impact three constituencies on college and university campuses: NIH-funded investigators; institutional research administrators and legal counsel; and librarians. This paper will explore the new policy's requirements of each constituency, the roles each may consider playing to ensure effective compliance with the policy, and the new opportunities that are afforded to all of the three groups by this groundbreaking initiative.

Heather Joseph talks about her career with SPARC and BioOne. She discusses the NIH mandate that NIH-funded research will be deposited into PubMed Central, and she shares her views on some of the controversial issues the mandate has raised about copyright, peer review, and embargo periods. She also addresses the recent decision by the Harvard faculty to make their scholarly output accessible through the university’s institutional repository, and she suggests ways that librarians can help their faculties prepare for open access.