Public Access

It's been just over a decade since the concept of Open Access (OA) first captured the attention of the scientific and scholarly research community, bringing with it the promise and potential of a shining new digital landscape, in which knowledge is freely shared and freely used, and the pace of s

In order to support continued adoption of the principles outlined in the Berlin Declaration, as well as to track progress on their implementation, the original signatories agreed to support regular follow-up meetings.

This guide contains the public access policy template, an overview of the steps necessary to deposit manuscripts and publications, and a number of resources for HRA member organizations that can be customized to share with their awardees.

In "Open Access," Peter Suber provides a concise introduction that explains what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold.

In 2012, the Committee for Economic Development released the report, "The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?" which concluded that federal Open Access policies will accelerate the research process and return significant economic dividends.

A SPARC white paper by Richard Johnson.

The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) provided support for a feasibility study, to outline one possible approach to measuring the impacts of the proposed US Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA) on returns to public investment in R&D.

This White Paper is written primarily for policymaking staff in universities and other institutional recipients of NIH support responsible for ensuring compliance with the Public Access Policy.

On December 26, 2007, President Bush signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008 into law. The bill contained language requiring all investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to place a copy of manuscripts resulting from NIH-funded research into the National Library of Medicine's online repository, PubMed Central, to be made publicly available within one year of publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The policy will take effect April 7, 2008, and will impact three constituencies on college and university campuses: NIH-funded investigators; institutional research administrators and legal counsel; and librarians. This paper will explore the new policy's requirements of each constituency, the roles each may consider playing to ensure effective compliance with the policy, and the new opportunities that are afforded to all of the three groups by this groundbreaking initiative.

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Why Access Matters