Public Access

It's been just over a decade since the concept of Open Access (OA) first captured the attention of the scientific and scholarly research community, bringing with it the promise and potential of a shining new digital landscape, in which knowledge is freely shared and freely used, and the pace of s

In order to support continued adoption of the principles outlined in the Berlin Declaration, as well as to track progress on their implementation, the original signatories agreed to support regular follow-up meetings.

SPARC is pleased to join with PLOS and OASPA in releasing an update to the popular HowOpenIsIt? Open Access Spectrum (OAS) guide.

In 2012, the Committee for Economic Development released the report, "The Future of Taxpayer-Funded Research: Who Will Control Access to the Results?" which concluded that federal Open Access policies will accelerate the research process and return significant economic dividends.

In "Open Access," Peter Suber provides a concise introduction that explains what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold.

A SPARC white paper by Richard Johnson.

This White Paper is written primarily for policymaking staff in universities and other institutional recipients of NIH support responsible for ensuring compliance with the Public Access Policy.

The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) provided support for a feasibility study, to outline one possible approach to measuring the impacts of the proposed US Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA) on returns to public investment in R&D.

Background and aims

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Why Access Matters